The identity of Dr. Famous of the stem cell field

I recently did a post and a poll on whether a blogger scientist should blog about a very weak, but sexy paper from a famous, powerful scientist whom I called “Dr. Famous”.

The poll is still getting a lot of hits so I’m not going to discuss the results yet as it is still ongoing.

However, something quite interesting has happened in the mean time that I want to blog about.

Six people have privately contacted me assuming (A) that I meant a specific person by Dr. Famous and (B) either guessing or already sure they know the identity of Dr. Famous.

Remarkably, all six told me/implied to me that Dr. Famous was a different person!

This has mad me laugh out loud multiple times, but then also it kinda worried me because I’m wondering if all these candidate Dr. Famous people might get mad at me.

So some clarity is needed.

Folks, there is no one, specific Dr. Famous, at least not to me. But apparently to you guys there are many specific Dr. Famouses in the stem cell field.

Sorry to disappoint. Dr. Famous is a symbol, not a real person, to me at least.

3 thoughts on “The identity of Dr. Famous of the stem cell field


  1. I think this shows that the infamous Dr. Famous is pretty common ground.
    I really like a quote by the wonderful Sir Muir Gray “In the nineteenth century health was transformed by clear, clean water. In the twenty-first century, health will be transformed by clean clear knowledge”

    It is interesting that in the beautiful Hans Gosling TedTalk that information visualization shows healthcare improves not just by GNP but more through the educated populace http://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_shows_the_best_stats_you_ve_ever_seen.html?utm_expid=166907-19&utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ted.com%2Fsearch%3Fcat%3Dss_all%26q%3DHans%2BRosling%26page%3D2
    I belong to an organization where the mission is HIFA2015 Health information for all by the year 2015. Global knowledge exchange can level the playing field. I am thankful for open data sharing and blogs that explain science http://www.ithinkwell.org/thinkwell-supports-hifa2015-healthcare-information-for-all-by-2015/.


  2. Typo above should be Hans Rosling. He shows that social change precedes economic prosperity. It seems we think only with an ideal economic climate can we promote change, here it seems that when we change the economy follows…

  3. Pingback: Go ahead & blog about Dr. Famous’ sexy, but crappy paper, most people say | Knoepfler Lab Stem Cell Blog

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