My 2017 New Year’s Stem Cell Resolution

CIRM is doing a fun, positive challenge to the stem cell community to post stem cell resolutions for the new year. You can read more about it here.

Be sure if you post yours on Twitter to include the #StemCellResolution hashtag. Have fun!

Below is my resolution in video form.

Top 20 Stem Cell Predictions for 2017

stem cell crystal ball

Stem cell crystal ball

Each year I make a list of predictions for the stem cell and regenerative medicine field for the coming new year. Later in this post I list my top 20 stem cell predictions for 2017. In looking at my past predictions I realized this will now be my 7th year doing stem cell/regenerative medicine yearly predictions.

You can see below links to these predictions for past years, which sometimes seems rather far removed from today and in other cases strike me as strangely apropos of our times.

What will 2017 bring? Below are my top 20 predictions in no particular order except starting with a few hopeful visions for the coming year.

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Top 10 reasons for optimism on Stem Cell Awareness Day 2016

Happy Stem Cell Day!

It is a tumultuous time for the stem cell and regenerative medicine fields, but despite this there are concrete reasons for optimism on this Stem Cell Awareness Day. I’ve listed my top 10 below. What else gives you a sense of optimism? You can also check out CIRM’s nifty stem cell awareness day page too, from which I borrowed the below image.stem-cell-awareness-day-2016

  1. More trials = road to progress. There are more real, robust clinical trials than ever and they are progressing past the early phases in some cases. The trials are piling up and while not all will succeed, some will. Keep an eye open for the for-profit, non-FDA-approved ones and steer people away from those.
  2. We are seeing a flow of clinical trial data too pointing to encouraging outcomes, but also to challenges to overcome (witness the preclinical study on IPSC for heart attacks that found efficacy but also arrhythmias). With that kind of awareness such hurdles can be overcome in many cases as the work progresses.
  3. The FDA held public meetings on stem cells. We can grouch about certain things about these meetings and we can ding the FDA for various issues, but it never before has engaged with the community like this on stem cells so it’s a good thing.
  4. Stem cells firing on all cylinders: adult and pluripotent. Adult stem cell trials are building, but so now are pluripotent ones. The best way to help the most people in the long run is with all the tools (types of cells) we can utilize. The notion of “adult versus embryonic”, for instance, as some sort of cosmic battle seems out of date. We need both and also IPSC as well as other types as yet to come.
  5. The stem cell clinic problem out in the open. Never before has there been this much information and awareness out there on the problem of stem cell clinics taking advantage of vulnerable people. For instance, see my recent article with Leigh Turner and the one from John Rasko’s group. I believe awareness will translate into action for the positive.
  6. Putting the fun back in funding? NIH funding trends are looking at least slightly better overall which will help with stem cell research. CIRM is continuing its life extension and will fund many more projects in years to come. Other states are funding stem cell research too. It’s still a bad time for funding but the trend lines are at least moving the right way.
  7. Much more educational outreach on stem cells. When I started blogging about stem cells in early 2010 it was very quiet out there on the Internet in terms of those of us trying to educate a wider community in a positive manner. That’s really changed now with quite a few blogs that at least touch on stem cells and a number entirely dedicated to stem cells and regenerative medicine. This is a positive change and it means the public has more resources than ever to learn about stem cells.
  8. IPSC clinically-relevant work is looking up. It was a decade ago that IPSC cells were “born” and there were great expectations. Now 10 years later there are tangible signs that these cells will have lasting, huge impact including both from disease modeling and more recently via potential future clinical use.
  9. Stem cells meet CRISPR and…boom! Okay so everyone is nuts about CRISPR no matter what kind of cells they study including me, but CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing combined with stem cells in particular equals great potential both for new insights such as into human development and also potentially clinically through designer stem cells.
  10. Stem cell biotechs & stocks hanging in there. It has always been tough going for stem cell biotechs and that is likely to continue quite a while longer, but many are hanging in there and could surprise you down the road. Others have been acquired by pharma companies or inked collaborative deals in the last year or so. In the long run some of these companies are going to change medicine.

Early, but encouraging data from Asterias on stem cells for spinal cord injury

asteriasAs I posted recently, Asterias Biotherapeutics has had good early safety results so far in its historic stem cell trial for spinal cord injury and now the company presented some early, encouraging hints at efficacy.  However, a caveat here is that this is not an RCT (randomized controlled trial).

Ed Wirth, CMO of Asterias, presented the early data at the 55th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Spinal Cord Society. You can take a look at the very interesting talk slides here. Asterias is a subsidiary of BioTime.

According to the press release (PR) from the company, while only 4 of 5 patients are 90 days or more after treatment, all patients have shown some improvement in motor function and a subset have a substantial improvement, meeting the target at this point. This trial is funded in part by CIRM so kudos to our state’s stem cell agency on this.

MIT Tech Review is on the story to for more background. I’ve also posted from Dr. Wirth’s PowerPoint the study design image below.asterias-sci-stem-cell-study-design

Bottom line. Overall, I think this development is encouraging. While still early in the clinical trial and drug testing process, the fact that there is a good safety profile and early indications of possible efficacy yield real hope. Still, it is important to be cautious in interpreting early data. We’ll all need to follow this trial and then look for future RCT results to clarify how promising this drug is overall in the long haul.

I’ve posted the key bullet points from the Asterias PR below the fold.

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8 key arguments, take-homes on day 1 of FDA stem cell meeting

Today was the first part of the FDA’s 2-day meeting on stem cell draft guidances. It was a great meeting I thought.

randy-mills-cirm-fda

Screenshot from video of FDA stem cell meeting of CIRM President Randy Mills speaking.

A few consistent themes and notable things emerged as raised by participants.

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